Kindness

Latest Posts

Saturday, 16 October 2021

AFRICAN FOLKTALES REIMAGINED: NETFLIX & UNESCO SHORT FILM COMPETITION

Keeping It Real (KIR) Foundation

 


Africa has a rich heritage of storytelling and a young population that is ready to step up and tell Africa’s stories, in all their multiplicity. We’re excited by the fresh new voices that are ready to tell the stories they were told by prior generations, to the world. Netflix has partnered with UNESCO to launch a short film competition, “African Folktales, Reimagined,” to find the bravest, wittiest, and most surprising retellings of some of Africa’s most-loved folktales. We can’t wait to see what you’ve got.



How to apply:


Applications open

  • Applications will open from October 14th, 2021 via this website. They will close on November 14th, 2021 at 11:59 PM (GMT).


Submit synopsis

  • You will need to submit a synopsis of your concept (no more than 500 words) in a Creative Statement as well as a link to a recent CV and a portfolio of any past audiovisual work you have produced.


The shortlist

  • We’ll announce our top 20 finalists in January who will then be invited to a “How to Pitch to Netflix” workshop.


The finalists

  • Our final 6 winners will be selected by an independent judging panel guided by Netflix and UNESCO.


ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

  • You are under 35 years old
  • You are a citizen and resident of a Sub-Saharan African country
  • You are a filmmaker with limited experience, but have developed and produced 1- to 2 theatrical feature films, television fiction, documentaries, or 2-3 short films and/or commercials seeking to venture into feature film development and production

If you're eligible for this competition then visit https://netflix-growcreative.com/unesco/ to apply.

Tuesday, 10 August 2021

Keeping It Real (KIR) Foundation

Boosting Illiteracy In Nigeria: OctaFX Secures Partnership With Humanitarian Organisation; Keeping It Real (KIR) Foundation.

The global Forex broker OctaFX partnered with ‘Keeping It Real’ to tackle the challenge of supporting Nigeria’s disadvantaged children. The Ramadan-inspired initiative aims at improving literacy in several regions of the country.  

Ramadan is always the season of charity, and the last Ramadan in this sense was special for many. With this in mind, the global Forex broker OctaFX took it upon itself to partner with the charity-based ‘Keeping it Real’ (KIR) organisation to set up ‘Reading Corners’, providing learning opportunities for disadvantaged children.

The fintech company supported Keeping It Real (KIR) Foundation in setting up these unique corners in the following states: Rivers, Lagos, Oyo, and the nation’s capital Abuja. As their primary vision, the charity group aims to “raise innovative leaders committed to lifelong learning to transform their communities”.

Speaking on the objectives of the partnership, Bitebo Gogo, Executive Director of ‘Keeping It Real’ said: “We decided to start giving books to those who want to read, but do not have access to books. Since then, we have donated over 26,000 books in 12 states in Nigeria, in our capital Abuja, and even Ghana. Also, the COVID-19 pandemic has made children in public schools lose one year of reading. A gap we are closing with the help of OctaFX.”

Keeping It Real (KIR) Foundation promotes literacy and education by donating books to orphanages, care homes, public schools, youth centres, out-of-school children, and even prison inmates. They consistently put books in the hands of those eager to learn but do not have the means to buy or access books. Through these efforts, KIR contributes to raising the standard of education in giving learning opportunities to long-neglected but crucial groups.





To read more about this, Visit https://www.vanguardngr.com/2021/07/boosting-literacy-in-nigeria-octafx-secures-partnership-with-humanitarian-organisation-keeping-it-real/ 

Friday, 9 July 2021

How Does A Word Get Into The Dictionary?

Keeping It Real (KIR) Foundation



    Written by: Becca Marsh
Reading time: 4 mins
Last updated: March 17, 2021


Have you ever wondered how a word gets into the dictionary?

Does one person decide or does it have to go through a number of people before being granted permission to be published?

In this article, we will be looking at how a word gets into the dictionary.

To put it simply a word gets into the dictionary when it becomes a popularly used word.

New words, such as slang and abbreviations are added to the dictionary once they start to appear across a substantial amount of sources and are regularly spoken.

Once a word is commonly used and there is an understanding of a common meaning it can be considered to be added to the dictionary.


To learn more about the process, visit https://www.thefactsite.com/how-words-get-into-dictionary/

Monday, 3 May 2021

Royal Academy of Engineering Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation 2022

Keeping It Real (KIR) Foundation

 

The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation, founded by the Royal Academy of Engineering, is Africa’s biggest prize dedicated to engineering innovation. It awards crucial commercialisation support to ambitious African innovators developing scalable engineering solutions to local challenges, demonstrating the importance of engineering as an enabler of improved quality of life and economic development.

An eight-month period of tailored training and mentoring culminates in a showcase event where a winner is selected to receive £25,000 along with three runners-up, who are each awarded £10,000.


A low-cost water-powered ventilator, dissolvable bioplastic and 3D printed prosthetics are among the innovations chosen to receive crucial commercialisation support from the Royal Academy of Engineering after being shortlisted for its 2021 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation.

The Africa Prize recognises ambitious African innovators developing scalable engineering solutions to local challenges and this year’s shortlist represents nine countries including, for the first time, Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal, Ethiopia and the Gambia. Six of the 16-strong shortlist are female innovators.The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation, founded by the Royal Academy of Engineering, is Africa’s biggest prize dedicated to engineering innovation. It awards crucial commercialisation support to ambitious African innovators developing scalable engineering solutions to local challenges, demonstrating the importance of engineering as an enabler of improved quality of life and economic development.

An eight-month period of tailored training and mentoring culminates in a showcase event where a winner is selected to receive £25,000 along with three runners-up, who are each awarded £10,000.


A low-cost water-powered ventilator, dissolvable bioplastic and 3D printed prosthetics are among the innovations chosen to receive crucial commercialisation support from the Royal Academy of Engineering after being shortlisted for its 2021 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation.

The Africa Prize recognises ambitious African innovators developing scalable engineering solutions to local challenges and this year’s shortlist represents nine countries including, for the first time, Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal, Ethiopia and the Gambia. Six of the 16-strong shortlist are female innovators.